How to Prevent Fleas and Ticks on Your Pet

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Once more, it’s that time of year. It’s tick and flea season again, and nothing irritates a dog more than those annoying vermin. Conscientious dog owners are aware that the warm body and silky fur of their pet represents a private haven for these insects. However, once they settle down and start feeding on your pet’s blood, they can lead to a variety of health issues, including Lyme disease and skin infections. Asking your veterinarian, who has access to the most recent information on flea and tick treatments, preventatives, and information, is your best bet for safe and effective solutions. Dr. Jerry Klein, Chief Veterinary Officer of the American Kennel Club, provides 11 recommendations for treating and preventing fleas and ticks.

How to Prevent Fleas and Ticks on Your Pet

11 Tips To Prevent Ticks and Fleas

Using one of the many veterinary-approved flea and tick products on the market is the best way to handle prevention. To determine the best and most suitable flea and tick prevention product for your dog, consult your veterinarian. Shampoos, collars, and topical treatments for fleas and ticks are available; each is designed to meet a particular purpose. Additionally, in severe weather, you can try these sun and bug blocker overalls, which shield you from UV rays and biting insects.

    Examine the label. Unless the label specifically states that it is made for both cats and dogs, never, ever give flea medication meant for cats to dogs.

    Once more, it’s that time of year. It’s tick and flea season again, and nothing irritates a dog more than those annoying vermin. Conscientious dog owners are aware that the warm body and silky fur of their pet represents a private haven for these insects. However, once they settle down and start feeding on your pet’s blood, they can lead to a variety of health issues, including Lyme disease and skin infections. After walks in grassy or wooded areas, check yourself and your dogs for ticks on a regular basis (even if they are taking a tick preventative). When examining dogs, pay close attention to the areas under the legs, on the lips, under the tail, near the anus, around the eyes, ears, and inside the ears. Make sure to check beneath your dog’s collar as well. Check your dog’s body for any lumps, and if you do find any, part the fur to examine them.

    Your dog is less likely to develop a secondary illness linked to tick bites the sooner you remove a tick. Find out how to remove ticks properly. Purchase a tick removal tool or a pair of fine tweezers specifically for this use. Ideally, you should remove the tick by the head while wearing gloves. Give your veterinarian a call if you are unable to remove the tick.

    Purchase an outside dog bed. By lounging off the ground, your dog can enjoy outdoor time in safety and comfort.

    Make sure to mow the grass in your yard as short as feasible. If at all possible, avoid entering grassy areas in endemic tick areas. Additionally advised by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are clearing your yard of brush, tall grasses, and leaf litter.

    Look for fleas on parts of your dog where the coat is thin or sparse. Consider the armpits, the insides of the hind limbs, and the belly. Fleas on your dog’s skin are microscopic, copper-colored, and move quickly. Additionally, you might notice “flea dirt,” or excrement, which are microscopic, dark spots that, when placed on a wet paper towel, turn red from digested blood.

    Treat all of your dogs at once if you have more than one. This will lessen the chance of cross-infection. Another way to lower your dog’s risk of contracting fleas during flea season is to keep them apart from other dogs.

    The surrounding environment needs to be taken care of while the dogs are being treated. Vacuum the sofas and carpets thoroughly, wash all bedding in hot water with laundry soap, and either heat dry it or discard it. Make sure to empty the vacuum containers outside once you’re finished.

    A “fogger” can be utilized if there is a significant flea infestation in your house. All pets and people must leave the room for 12 to 24 hours after using a flea and tick fogger (carefully read the label instructions to determine safety, or consult your veterinarian). Make sure the fogger you select kills both adult fleas and flea larvae.

    Professional exterminators might be required if the infestation is severe enough or in areas of the nation where fleas are common. Hopefully, that is not the case!

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